Aging in Place (AIP)

America’s 75 million aging adults soon will face decisions about where and how to live as they age. Current options for long-term care, including nursing homes and assisted-living facilities, are costly and require seniors to move from place to place. Quality of care in nursing homes has long been under scrutiny by the public and government regulators. Under this microscope, how can nurses improve quality of care in nursing homes?

Rantz, M. (2016). Aging in Place: critical for seniors to remain independent. Population Health News, 3(6), 1, 5.

EXPERT AVAILABLE: Aging in Place Critical for Seniors to Remain Independent

MU Professor Marilyn Rantz credits advanced nurses, technology and coordinated care as means for improving patient care and lowering health care costs

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Quality of care in nursing homes has long been under scrutiny of the public and government regulators. Under this microscope, how can nurses improve quality of care in nursing homes? That question has laid the research foundation for Marilyn Rantz, Curators’ Professor Emerita of Nursing in the Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri. Over the past 30 years, Rantz has established herself as a premier international expert in quality measurement in nursing homes and research programs to improve quality of care of older people. Through her research she has found that nurses, coordinated care and technology all play pivotal roles in improving patient care and lowering health care costs for aging populations.

Finding ways to help older adults "age in place" has been a focus of researchers at the University of Missouri for more than a decade. Now, a new study shows their work at TigerPlace, an independent living community that uses sensor technology and onsite care coordination to maintain residents' health, is successful.

Older adults live independently longer when monitored by care team and technology

Foresight - Health Risk Detection System - presented at the 2015 Innovation & Entrepreneurial Recognition Dinner at the University of Missouri.

YouTube video

AgingMO is Copyrighted by the Sinclair School of Nursing

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